The Mistakes You Need To Know About Before You Print

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Printing the project, you have worked on for days is akin to the last spurt of a marathon: it will decide the value of all your efforts until then. If so, you certainly want to avoid any possible mistakes during this final stage – what exactly should you look out for? Find out below: 

  • Not proofreading – the very first mistake that everyone is aware of (and yet somehow, everyone seems to make) is not proofreading any work or projects before sending them to the printing services south Melbourne. You cannot expect your printer to do proofreading for you, which is why it is important to always check what you send to the printer one last time. Ideally, you want to avoid doing proofreading if you are the one who worked on the project – this is because you will miss any errors due to the familiarity with the work. If you cannot get another person to proofread your work, you should open up your project at another time (preferably a few hours later) so that you can check for any errors with a freshened mind.
    • Low resolutions – when it comes to B2, B3, A2, A3 poster printing or similar large print sizes, you should first understand the actual size of the print you will work with (for example, get a plain paper in the size you are working with, if you cannot get an idea). When it comes to computers, you will most likely be working with pixel resolutions, which means there might be a discrepancy when it comes to printing your work at the desired size – sometimes, you work at a bigger file size and no harm is done, but most of the time, people tend to work at smaller file sizes and therefore end up with a blurry image as a result. To avoid this, understand the meaning of resolutions: projects that need to be printed generally need to have at least 300dpi as their basic resolution, but you can work at higher resolutions such as 600dpi or higher.
      • Printing in RGB – another mistake that is common to digital projects is the use of RGB mode for printing. Colour reproduction in digital devices is done through the RGB mode, whereas in printing, this is done through a different mode known as CMYK. CMYK colour reproduction on digital devices basically looks ‘washed out’ when compared to RGB mode, but it is important to understand that you will end up with much weaker colours if you print images in RGB format. Accordingly, to get the most faithful colour reproduction, most printers will recommend you to switch to CMYK mode before printing.